The Workplace and Simplification

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A friend shared a great TEDx Talk with me recently about the workplace and simplification and about asking the right questions.

I quit my job as CIO over a year for several reasons that I won’t go into here. Since then, I’ve thought about lessons learned and perhaps, things I might have done differently at different times in the role.

I think this talk gets to the heart of it. An organization must prioritize simplification, removing bureaucracy, be nimble and fast and create a culture where asking and answering hard questions is the way things are done. Seems like more could have been done on this front.

I really did love the people I worked with there and recently had a chance to see some of my colleagues for a visit. It was a great time.

 

Trust & Fraud When Vulnerable

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When I was a kid, our Dentist called months after I had been in for a cleaning and told my parents that he had been reviewing old x-rays and noticed 1-2 cavities on my teeth that they had not spotted earlier.

Even back then as a kid, it struck me that he could just be making this up because he needed more money. But there is no way to test this without going to the expense of another doctor for more x-rays.

For some reason, I’ve always remembered this.

Just recently, another friend had age-related, routine, diagnostics done at a special medical center and was told there were concerns leading to more tests, a procedure and then more tests out into the future all at substantial expense but all leading to no serious issue found.  And then this person had two more friends have the same diagnostics, at the same place, leading to the similar results and test and again with no issue found.

We are so scared of the C word that we jump through every single hoop to test, evaluate, diagnose and re-test. Our fear of the C word is fully justified as we all have stories. However, that fear makes us very vulnerable to fraud, wasted time and money, possible harm from the tests themselves and then, of course, fake miracle cures.

I do not know the solution to this problem other than to ask around when needing professional help in any matter (doctor, accountant, lawyer, etc.), seek 2nd opinions on serious matters, and try to remain calm and wise in your decisions.

Regarding the Dentist, I vaguely recall that we didn’t stay with him much longer. Can’t even recall if we went back to have those ‘cavities’ filled. That same Dentist once was needing to remove a tooth in my mouth and he deadened the wrong side of the mouth and was about to start cutting before I stopped him.

 

 

Calendar Invites and Friction

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If you are using an electronic calendar organizer like Google Calendar and you routinely invite others to meetings using that tool, please think about how you send invites carefully and plan ahead.

Name the event something that makes sense on ALL the recipients’ calendars, not just your own

If your name is Betty and you are meeting with John next Tuesday, you don’t send an invite titled ‘Meet with John’ because, on John’s calendar, it will say that the meeting is with himself in the title. The event perhaps looks reasonable on your calendar, but it looks ridiculous on the other end. And, you don’t want him to have to do other work on his end to make it reasonable. You want to be able to just accept the invite and he is done.

Put the full location on the Where line

Furthermore, on the ‘Where’ line, put the full, exact, correct location for the meeting. If in a conference room in a building, put THE CONFERENCE ROOM NAME and THE FULL ADDRESS OF WHERE THE CONFERENCE ROOM BUILDING IS LOCATED every time. Again, just like the previous hint about the title, make the ‘Where’ right for all participants. You don’t want other participants to have to call at the last minute to figure out where the meeting is located.

One further reason to get the address right is that many times car navigation systems or phone driving directions are taken directly from the calendar entry without any typing. Get it right on the calendar so it can be used for navigation.

If a phone call, put the full phone number with area code in the title

Recently I’ve received:

  • an invite with a completely incorrect address where I’m supposed to drive to the meeting so I had to be a detective to figure it out.
  • an invite to a meeting with just the conference room name in the ‘where’ and I’m not located at that company and will be driving there.
  • an invite with a meaningless line in the title. I’m meeting someone at a restaurant for a catch-up and the title is the name of the restaurant. If I look at that entry on my phone in a week, I’ll have to open it up to see who is attending.
  • and an invite where I’m meeting with myself.

I’ve gotten into the habit of doing invite titles like these:

  • Talk – Tim/Mark,
  • Lunch – Tim/Mark,
  • Account Review – Tim/Sam/Mark
  • Call – Tim/Mark      Mark call Tim @ 1-405-555-5555

I’m surprised at how many people don’t get this right or persist in sending invites that are focused on the sender’s point of view.