Pay and What is Right

I’ve been trying to figure out how to write this post. Can’t quite find the rights words or even the right way to start. I’m no great writer, but usually I can find the right words. So, I’ll just do this.

It is unacceptable that women are being paid less than men for the same jobs. 

I understand that there are huge complexities is doing large studies and benchmark because of differences in jobs, tenure, backgrounds, etc. but at the simplest level, all employers and leaders, should and must be making active efforts to normalize and level the playing field.  A story in the Guardian earlier this year says:

Sucheta Nadkarni, professor and director of the Wo+Men’s Leadership Centre at Cambridge Judge business school, says that – despite flaws – the figures do indicate men are paid more than women on average. She said: “Whether it is because women are getting paid less for the work that they are doing or because women are not getting equal opportunities to get into positions where the pay level is high – it doesn’t matter what the reason is, but there is a gender pay gap and in most cases it’s an issue of equality and justice. In both cases it’s an issue of an imbalance of some sort.”

Gender pay gap: what we learned and how to fix it

I see three reasons why all of us must work to fix these problems.

First, it is just the right thing to do. I shouldn’t have to explain this one. 

Second, we need all the best people we can find in our workforce and in leadership positions. Any organization that wants to succeed or prosper or even exist, needs the best people it can find on its workforce. Any practice or policy that ‘slights’ or ‘devalues’ one group over another is not doing all it can to succeed. Why would anyone want part of their workforce to feel slighted? Don’t we want to attract the best people possible in all our positions? This applies to race, religion, etc. too.

Finally, the third reason, which is gender specific, is that I do believe we need more women in leadership positions. We need their viewpoints and life experiences informing and driving decisions being made in government, corporations and nonprofits.  Related, I wonder if the #metoo movement would be different or even necessary if there were far more women in leadership positions everywhere. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is famous for her remark that ‘There will be enough women on the Supreme Court when there are nine’ which is funny but the principle is valid. I’d be fine with nine women on the supreme court but we would then likely miss the male viewpoint on some key issues.

A recent survey reported that 52% of Americans would feel “very comfortable” with a female president to which I reply why isn’t that 95% or 98% or 100%? 

It is time for men to speak up and address matters that are holding women back from advancement, leadership or equal pay.